ThatSoftwareDude

Musings of a .NET Developer, CTO and Tech Enthusiast

#Computer Science
advice for new computer science grads

Graduation season is upon us and with that, many fresh grads are leaving the warm shelter of A+ tests to the colder realms of "Yes, I have no real world experience". But fret not. That's a part of the game. Nobody expects a fresh grad to come out of college to run Facebook. But it isn't a simple process either getting your foot in the door.

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looking beyond computers in computer science

The definition of Computer Scientist has changed many times during the past century. Even more so now with the popularization and novelty of it with various movements springing up to "teach code" and "anyone can be a programmer!" as their slogan. And we're essentially narrowing the definition down year by year as to what it means to be a scientist of technology. It's starting to mean, to code, to program, to drag and drop buttons on a screen, or "canvas", as it were. It's starting to mean, to store data in a database, and to configure a connection string. And more importantly, it means to delve into it strictly in a work environment, and taking it out of our real world.

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taking the "science" out of computer science

Studying Computer Science in college is unusually difficult. I say unusual, because 80% of all that science concepts taught will probably only be used by 2% of the resulting workforce. In my 4 years of college, I never once took a class in web development, which is ironic as that has been my official title for the past 9 years, along with everyone else that I had the pleasure of graduating with. And it leaves me wondering what happened to all of that wonderful science that I spent countless days dreaming over. So today I'll be talking about science, where it's gone and where it's headed, and whether it has a place in modern society anymore, in this age of smartphones and app development. . . .

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computer science for all may not be the right answer

Recently the President proposed a 4 billion dollar plan that would enable public schools to teach computer science courses to everyone from K-12 in order to fill the ever increasing demand of programmers out there today. And once again, it brings "coding" to the front-lines. We saw something similar in 2014 when the US President became the first to write a line of code in the Hour of Code campaign. And once again I find myself playing devils advocate, mainly because I don't think everyone needs to code and because it takes more than one hour to learn how to do it. If it were that simple, then why not start the "Hour of Healing" and have everyone K-12 learn how to become doctors. And if we are going to do that, then let's indeed teach kids how to become doctors, or how to become astrophysicists, and not just focus on this thing that we call "code".

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