ThatSoftwareDude

Musings of a .NET Developer, CTO and Tech Enthusiast

#productivity
nikola tesla died penniless, and that's alright

Nikola Tesla has been making the news rounds lately, probably due to his recent birthday. Happy late birthday Mr. Tesla. And after reading a few articles on his achievements, many of which are very well known to me as I am a huge admirer of his and have been for decades now, I noticed a recurring theme. Many articles focused on his money troubles, or supposed troubles, and his difficult times he faced in achieving his many goals. Many articles ended on a sad and somewhat morose tone. They paid extra attention on the last moments of Mr. Tesla's life. The last few years of an inventors elderly life, tired no doubt, but proud of every last creation.

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key skills in the digital space

As more and more people are starting to work in the digital space, the way that jobs work is beginning to change. Gone are the days when the only skills you’d need for a job were English and maths, and the age of the skill has come in true force. Nowadays, more jobs than ever expect you to have some computing skills. So, to help you out, this post will be exploring some of the best skills you can have in the world of business, along with the to . . .

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programming in cubicles vs open floor plans

There are main 2 ways that you'll be working in an office environment if you're a programmer. And that's either in a cubicle, which we've seen plenty of in movies and such, and there is the open space plan, which many new companies are adopting. Many notable companies, like Google and Apple, are setting the bar high by removing boundaries and getting their employees to coexist together in large expanses of open space. And that's a pretty fantastic idea for the most part. At least in theory and in aesthetics. But it doesn't come without its shortcomings.

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the 5 minute rule to get things done

Every individual has their own method of getting stuff done. Whether it's through some online to do list application or through their own handwritten set of notes scribbled on a yellow pad on their desk. Once we get used to our method, it sort of becomes our de facto standard for how we run our day. It may work, it may not work. We won't be able to tell easily. My normal routine consisted of opening notepad and jotting down a list of the first 10-20 things that came to mind to accomplish for the day. Does it work? To some extent. 40-50% of the items on that list get completed, in no particular order. But is there a better method?

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should coffee shops get rid of wifi

It's hard to picture a coffee shop these days that doesn't offer WiFi to its customers with the purchase of a drink. It's become common practice to have it, and many times if you don't, customers won't be breaking your doors down. And the more patrons you have, the better your WiFi and the more expensive your running costs can be. So some coffee shops have decided to do without it, and, it's actually not as bad as it sounds for a few reasons that we'll discuss today.

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why to do lists don't work

To do lists are hard, as one can tell from the hundreds upon hundreds that exist out in the interwebs today. And for the most part, they all tend to do the same thing. And that is they keep a list of text items in a list-based format, and then allow you to set different statuses upon them, such as completed, important, and pending.

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do no easy things

Most humans have this built in tendency to focus on the easy things in life. There's a small dopamine reward given for each tiny win. So they continue to keep it up as long as they possibly can and for the most part it's enough to function and maintain a relatively normal societal lifestyle. A paycheck for example, will give you that "feel good" feeling momentarily, until you spend it all and crave that next one. Paychecks are pretty easy. You already have the job and all you have to do is show up and do the same thing you did the day before. Easy as in predictable, not as in simple. You might manage a team of 12 and work 18 hours per day. Not a simple job, but the work process is relati . . .

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if you don't know how, then do it quickly

I have a stuffed doll that talks when you put pressure on his chest. He says a number of things in a sequential order. And as I cleaned up my work environment the other day, he went off and wisdom spewed from its tiny microprocessor sound chip mouth. And it got me thinking. It stated the following:

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how to finish a project

One of the toughest things to battle once you reach a certain level of programming knowledge is the influx of ideas that will flow into you constantly, and unexpectedly. You'll be walking around carelessly one minute, just to be bombarded by possible app/website ideas the next. And they all sound amazing to you. And some of them very well could be, but you have about a dozen amazing ideas sitting on your desktop at home at this moment waiting to be completed.

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using a standing desk for 6 months

Like many office workers, I had a long history of being a paper weight for office chairs. And I've tried all the chairs in life, believe me. Regular office chairs, extra large "I feel like I'm 5 again" office chairs and the pricier chairs that are supposed to miraculously cure my back. And after 10 years, my back just got worse and worse, and my posture got more abstract and artistic, much like a 19th century art piece.

Driving for an extended 2 hours per day did not help this situation and I was on a fast road to becoming an oval of some kind. Which is why 6 months ago, I decided to jump on the standing desk band-wagon once again and to go all out with it. I've tried standing . . .

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